Small, quaint cafes are tucked underneath the towering pastel-colored buildings that line the cobblestone streets. In Prague, life runs a little slower. Locals can casually sip on their morning coffee while reading the daily paper for hours, watching as people walk the streets and ride trams across the city.

On my first evening in Prague, I walked to Café Milani, a small coffee shop near Wenceslas Square, the long and lively city center of the town and a World Heritage Site.

The aroma of freshly grounded coffee beans and cigarette smoke hit me in the face, but it didn’t prevent me from taking a seat and spending an hour with a latte and good company. Couples sat on wood-wick chairs and laugh quietly. The sounds of metal silverware was properly set on the table and light conversation broke the strain of people racing through the streets to get to their destinations.  

It felt like a breath of fresh air after a long day traveling in a stuffy airplane cabin for 10 hours. To sit and people-watch while talking with newfound friends was an amazing way to start our adventure in Europe. We talked endlessly about our lives back home and our aspirations for our time in Prague and Budapest. There is no hustle and bustle here like in the states, where we rush to do everything all at once. Café life makes time cease to exist, and as someone who always seems to run out of time, that is OK.